Three things we love about the Mustang Comp by Cycling Plus

Mustang comp

Its evocative name If you were around for the early days of UK mountain biking, you will have seen the original Raleigh Mustang, its exotically painted tubes promising uninhibited exploration. Before the drive for lightness, comfort and more performance, early mountain bikes opened up a whole new world. With a drop bar, 1x transmission and balloon tyres, today’s Mustang maintains some of the original bike’s ethos.

Its all-round ability Raleigh’s Gravel Road geometry, with its long wheelbase and lower bottom bracket, offers oil tanker-like stability over rough terrain. A shortish stem
ensures positive steering, and there’s clearance for even bigger rubber, or full mudguards, and rack mounts too. Fitted with 26mm-wide American Classic TCX tubeless-ready rims and Schwalbe’s 35mm G1 gravel tyres, it rolls quickly on tarmac and has plenty of grip on everything short of wet mud, as well as excellent cushioning.

Its component spec SRAM’s Rival 1 hydraulic levers and disc brakes ensure heaps of modulated power, but the real bonus is the drivetrain. Despite our doubts, the 44t chainset and 10-42t cassette covered all bases. From long, steep climbs to fast descents, we didn’t want for gears, and the gaps were reasonable too. It’s simple, reliable and child’s play to use.

To find out more about the Mustang Comp click here >

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Raleigh Militis Race wins the BikesEtc Best of British test

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Before we get round to the enviable task of throttling the Raleigh over a four-hour ride in
the Peaks, it’s clear that the Militis is one well-appointed bike. Running the same frameset as the brand’s pro team bikes, and comprehensively specced with SRAM’s second-tier Force groupset, from shifters to brakes to chainset to derailleurs, it’s festooned with equipment of the level we’ve seen on road bikes costing £1,000 more. It’s
also a real head-turner, not least for its wearing of the traditional Raleigh heron head badge, but especially thanks to its eye-catching tangerine and metal-effect paint job. Turn up on the next club run on this and people will flock round you.

You’ll also batter them. The Raleigh’s race pedigree shows itself from the moment we set off down the descent of the Peak District’s Cat & Fiddle. It’s super-stable at speed in a straight line, and as we weave through the sinuous downhill turns, we need to recalibrate
our head – it changes direction so quickly that less experienced riders would call it twitchy. The way this bike turns, on the flat as well as when rocketing down a mountainside, is with the utmost directness and confidence. Schwalbe’s ever-excellent One tyres assist in this, especially in this 25c size, as a larger contact patch adds even more cornering assistance to these already grippy tyres.

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Overall, it’s a lightweight package, making uphill riding far from arduous. Equipped with a compact chainset and 11-28 cassette you could climb anything on this. However, the one
thing that holds us back in the Peaks is the 53/39 chainset, causing some grindingly slow ascents.

Sprints to cafés and up short ramps are made child’s play by the incredibly punchy frame, and Cole’s C27 wheelset is a cut above the usual budget wheels so often found fitted to otherwise highly-specified road bikes. Special mentions go to the all-day-cosseting Fizik Arione saddle and ergonomically perfect 400mm bars on our size 53 frame, topping off a truly excellent all-round package that would not only help you destroy your rivals a crit race but do just as good a job of supplying fun and comfort on your next sportive.

There’s no better testing ground for any bike than the gruelling climbs and precipitous descents of the Peak District, and all three of these bikes handled their duties on this punishing terrain with aplomb. Even the two of our bikes with standard double chainsets were capable of grinding out a climb, and all three offered enough speed to thrill. In fact, if you fail to be thrilled by a 50mph descent on a road bike, you might want to check your pulse to make sure you’re still alive.

What makes the Raleigh Militis Race our overall winner is simple. It offers the best
combination of poise, stiffness, confidence and overall specification to fit any situation.
Yes, it’s built to race, but if you’re looking for a bike to excite you on a long ride, it’ll ably
feed your adrenaline habit, too. Tifosi’s SS26 might be a little too focussed in its current
build to suit most riders, but if it’s a race bike you’re after, look no further. Equally, Hoy’s
Alto Irpavi .004 has abundant character and would be the only bike you’d need if leisure
rides in all conditions were on the cards. What all three bikes prove is that, while we might not be making them in numbers, Britain sure knows how to create a good bike build that’s designed to excel on the varied terrain of this green and pleasant land.

To find out more about the Militis Race click here >

Hit the trails with Raleigh’s 2016 Gravel road bike range

2015 has seen many new markets take shape in the cycle industry with the likes of 27.5″ becoming more dominant and the introduction of Boost seeing a new discipline being introduced.

One market that has been around for a while in many forms is the utility bike. It has many names, Adventure, All Road, Gravel and even Graventure.

After the introduction of the Raleigh Maverick range of utilitarian bikes we realised that it was time for us to take control of this market and expand our range and give it a clear and specific name. For 2016 the Gravel Road range was born….

The whole range is designed to be used on a multitude of terrains and give cyclists a bike that has one pure purpose, to enjoy cycling. The Gravel Road range is happy on loose surfaces, mud or tarmac, it can be fitted with mudguards, a rack and wider tyres making it completely adaptable. Our range is designed specifically to suit British conditions.

Models range from the alloy Mustang range up to the full carbon Roker range with the Maverick steel range sitting in the middle of the two. Our range will suit the beginner to the enthusiast, giving them a bike that is ready for the short trip to the shop right up to the weekend sportive or cycling holiday with the family.

The Cycling Weekly team recently came to visit us to take a look round the new range of Gravel Road bikes that are coming soon. Here is what they had to say.

Nine new carbon framed Roker and aluminium framed Mustang bikes greatly extend Raleigh’s adventure road bike options

For 2016 Raleigh has launched a new carbon adventure road bike range and extended its aluminium offerings. Named the Roker, the new carbon bike has a bang up to date spec. This includes SRAM’s 1x drivetrain with post mount hydraulic disc brakes on many models, thru axles front and rear and space for 35mm plus tyres. All cables and hoses are routed internally and the frame is equipped with bottle cage mounts.

Thru axle, hydraulic disc brakes and SchwalbeTubeless Easy tyres on the Roker Race

The top spec Roker Race costs £2500 and comes with a SRAM Force 1x drivechain with SRAM Force Hydro disc brakes. Wheels are American Classic Hurricane tubeless ready disc wheels. These follow the trend for wider rims with an internal width of 18mm and are 24mm deep. With 32 spokes laced three-cross front and rear, American Classic quote a weight of 1646g for the pair. They come shod with Schwalbe G-One gravel tyres, a brand new design from Schwalbe which uses its Tubeless Easy technology and has a small knobbed tread.

The Roker Race comes with a carbon seatpost and a Fizik Aliante saddle, which is well-padded to adsorb some of the jolts off-road.

For £650 the base model alloy Mustang comes with Shimano Claris drive chain

Below the Roker range sits the Mustang range which has aluminium frames and carbon forks. The top spec Mustang Comp model costs £1000 and comes with SRAM Rival 1x drivechain with Rival hydraulic disc brakes. The range extends down to a Shimano Claris equipped 16-speed bike priced at £650.

Raleigh will continue to offer its existing steel framed Maveric range, which extends up to the £1150 Elite equipped with SRAM Rival drivetrain, TRP HyRD hybrid mechanical-hydraulic disc brakes and 35mm tyres.


The bikes are due to be launched soon so keep a look out for them on the Raleigh website.